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MC-12

These days, even the cheapest processors can put things where they're supposed to go and do a relatively good job of it, but you'd be surprised how much even the most minute errors can affect your perception of realism.

Lexicon has been the darling of home-theater owners, particularly those who care most about their components' performance. The home-theater preamp-processors that Lexicon has made in the last five years—the DC-1, DC-2, and MC-1—have been among the best-performing products of their type.

Introducing the MC-12
It does everything that can be done at this point: Dolby Digital, EX, and Pro Logic II; DTS and DTS ES (both the matrixed and discrete variations); THX; and Lexicon's proprietary, highly regarded Logic 7 format (with Film, TV, and Music modes), which offers up to seven channels of sound for any source and can be applied to other processing modes, as well. As with the MC-1, each processing mode is highly adjustable and has multiple variations. DTS ES, for example, is available with Logic 7 Film, Logic 7 Music, THX, two-channel, and standard options. You end up getting around 30 different processing options, and none of them is called night club, stadium, or anything of the sort.

By including a two-channel analog bypass and 5.1-channel inputs (which, of course, also serve as an analog bypass), Lexicon has addressed two major MC-1 issues. Both of these features are currently in high demand, predominantly because of the relatively recent emergence of the SACD and DVD-Audio formats. Considering how new these formats are, it's easy to see why the 5.1 inputs were left off the MC-1 four years ago, but those of us who still feel the occasional itch for vinyl wouldn't have minded the two-channel bypass back then. You can apply the two-channel bypass to any of the analog input pairs via the advanced-settings menu. Both it and the 5.1-channel bypass are true throughput modes that forego all conversion, equalization, processing, and crossover. Turning off the bypass lets you access the MC-12's processing through the analog inputs, which is especially important for the 5.1-channel inputs. Many SACD and DVD-Audio players still don't offer bass management; however, unlike many pre/pros and receivers, the MC-12 will supply this when the bypass is defeated.

The MC-12 has plenty of inputs and outputs for each of its three zones: main, zone 2, and record (or a third output zone). There are 12 digital audio inputs, including six coaxial, five optical, and an AES/EBU jack, as well as eight analog audio inputs, which you can configure as eight regular inputs or five inputs plus the 5.1-channel input. As for video inputs, there are five composite, eight S-video, and four high-bandwidth component video, including one with BNC connections. Oddly, the single component output also uses BNC connections. Both the main and record zones offer two composite and two S-video outputs. Zone 2 is strictly audio, with both a fixed and variable analog output. Record/zone 3 also offers the fixed and variable analog outputs, plus optical and coaxial digital outputs. There's a whopping 12 main audio outputs, including front, side, rear, and auxiliary pairs, a center-channel output, and three subwoofer outputs (including a dedicated LFE channel). The MC-12 Balanced model (which costs an additional $1,000) adds balanced (XLR) output to the above and a balanced-output pair for zone 2. Rounding out the array are two RS-232 jacks, four microphone inputs, an IR input, trigger outputs, and an expansion slot that looks like it could eventually hold a DB-25 input.

We can only scratch the surface of the MC-12's capabilities by pointing out a few items. Four Analog Devices SHARC 32-bit DSP engines and a Cirrus Logic Crystal CS49326 DSP handle the processing; using the three expansion slots, you can more than quadruple the unit's processing capabilities. Each main audio output employs 24-bit/192-kilohertz digital-to-analog conversion operating in a dual-differential mode. Youcan uniquely adjust crossover points on all channels. Rather than simply selecting a large or small setting for the front, side, and rear speakers, each crossover is selectable in 10-hertz steps from 30 to 120 Hz, or you can select full-range. There's even a regular 80-Hz option engaging a 24-decibel/octave filter (as do all the other values), and a THX 80-Hz option, which engages a 12-dB/octave high-pass filter. It's hard to find a stone left unturned on this pre/pro. A minor but entertaining and unique feature is the custom-versus-preset option that allows you to A/B-test your custom settings against the MC-12's factory defaults with the press of a button.

"Transparent" sums up the MC-12's performance with movie soundtracks. It performed flawlessly, without the subtlest hint of editorialization, and still maintained its characteristic openness and engagement. The MC-12 passes its objective qualifications with flying colors. As with music, its ability to isolate random sounds in a film soundtrack by specifically concentrating on them created the impression that the pre/pro delivered each sound, no matter how minor, with as much care and attention as those that preceded it. Naturally, the soundtrack itself (especially a lossy one like Dolby Digital) will place greater emphasis on some elements than others—decisions that you may or may not agree with. The MC-12 gives you every opportunity to judge the talents of the mixers for yourself.

MC-12 enhanced with V4 EQ

For over 30 years, Lexicon has been a leader in audio innovation, devoting enormous expertise and resources to research and development. Lexicon’s Chief Scientist, Dr. David Griesinger, is widely acknowledged as one of the world’s leading experts in room acoustics. His research has led to the introduction of revolutionary room enhancement and reverberation algorithms, as well as the first stereo-to-7.1 decoder: LOGIC7®. Dr. James Muller has conducted extensive investigation into room equalization that has resulted in high-precision measurement and room mode correction techniques. In addition to their own work, they have also drawn on the latest research from industry experts. The result is V4 EQ – a groundbreaking room equalization tool.

With the release of the MC-12 V4 EQ upgrade, Lexicon has raised the bar for automatic room equalization, providing a solution that demonstrably improves the listening experience. It is easy to operate and requires only a small amount of user interaction to achieve superior results. The V4 EQ upgrade is a simple and effective way of making rooms sound better. The new V4 EQ upgrade for the MC-12 is a powerful tool that allows the user to find and correct for problematic low frequencies in the listening space. V4 EQ uses thorough and advanced room analysis techniques and is completely integrated with existing processing so that no additional A/D/A conversion is required. The V4 EQ upgrade doubles the amount of processing available to the MC-12, and provides up to seven filters per channel for up to ten output channels. Four microphones, designed to meet Lexicon’s stringent requirements for room analysis, enable optimization for the entire listening area. The Lexicon V4 EQ upgrade provides exceptional results without the need for extra equipment or additional analyses.

MC-4

Based on the reference MC-12, the MC-4 Digital Controller is perfectly suited for less complex multi-channel systems in which sound quality, picture quality, ease-of-use and reliability are still of paramount importance.

  • 8 channels, 8 configurable inputs
  • Up to two 5.1-channel analog audio inputs
  • Analog bypass available for stereo and 5.1-channel analog audio inputs
  • S/PDIF coaxial and S/PDIF optical digital audio inputs
  • Automatic switching between analog and digital audio inputs
  • 24-bit/192kHz D/A converters
  • Stereo side and rear outputs and a dedicated subwoofer output
  • 2 broadcast-quality video switchers
  • 3 component video inputs with full HD-TV compatibility
  • 5 S-video and 5 composite video inputs
  • 4 32-bit, floating-point DSP engines
  • Separate DSP engine to decode
  • Dolby Digital and DTS signals
  • LOGIC7® decoding
  • Dolby Digital Surround EX and
  • Dolby Pro Logic II decoding
  • DTS 96/24, DTS Neo:6, and
  • DTS-ES (matrix and discrete) decoding
  • THX Ultra2 and THX Surround EX decoding
  • 2 trigger outputs
  • Rear panel IR input
  • RS-232 control
  • Rack-mount option

Value
Equipped with 8 configurable inputs, and 8 channels of output, the MC-4 is ideal for all but the most elaborate systems. Drawing on Lexicon's legendary expertise in digital audio, the MC-4 offers superior performance and value for today's music and home theater enthusiast.

Powerful
At the heart of the MC-4 are four Analog Devices SHARC digital signal processing engines, one Cirrus Logic DSP engine, and eight 24-bit/192kHz digital-to-analog converters - an architecture that is nearly identical to the MC-12. As a result, the MC-12 and MC-4 share the same tremendous processing power and sonic soul. The MC-4 includes THX Ultra2 certification and dts 96/24 decoding. Rounding out its impressive list of playback technologies: Dolby Digital EX, Pro-Logic II, dts-ES, dts Neo6, and LOGIC7.

LOGIC7
The MC-4 features Lexicon's decoding technology: LOGIC7. Based on years of psychoacoustic research, LOGIC7 strikes a delicate balance between channel separation and surround envelopment. For music, film, and broadcast sources, LOGIC7 distinguishes between primary and background signals and processes them appropriately. Prominent sounds like a singer's voice or an airplane's roar are reproduced with stunning clarity. The signal is sent to the appropriate speaker with high channel separation, while secondary sounds like the ambient noise of a concert hall or the great outdoors are reproduced with amazing spaciousness. With LOGIC7, the listener experiences an unmatched sense of involvement.

Connected
With formats such as DVD-Video, DVD-Audio, Super Audio CD, and High-Definition TV, the demand for input connectors has grown. The MC-4 provides compatibility with these formats, offering 3 component video inputs and 8 configurable analog inputs. The analog inputs can be configured as 8 stereo inputs, 5 stereo inputs plus one 5.1-channel input, or 2 stereo inputs plus two 5.1-channel inputs for separate DVD-A and SACD sources.

Simple
The MC-4 uses the same intuitive on-screen menu system and user interface as the MC-12 for navigation of the set-up options and features. Both new users and those that are familiar with Lexicon digital controllers will instantly feel at home with the MC-4 and will be fine-tuning it in minutes.

Conclusion
Designed with a careful balance of performance and function, the MC-4 is sure to impress with its stellar performance, simple user interface, and set-up flexibility. Combined with an RT-10 disc player and an LX series power amplifier, the MC-4 serves as the core of a high performance, high value home theater system.

RT-10 with MX-8 & LX-5

Appealing
Designed to match the industrial design of Lexicon’s award-winning home theater products, the RT-10 is the obvious choice when contemplating a source component. The front panel is crafted from a 1/2” thick piece of solid aluminum, which is carefully machined and finished to create the unique look that distinguishes Lexicon’s new home theater line. The uncluttered front panel provides basic controls and a blue LED display. A single piece of aluminum covers the top, then wraps around the sides to the bottom and is coupled to the chassis with flush mounted machine screws. All of this results in a clean appearance that elegantly combines form and function. For systems utilizing an equipment rack, an optional rack mounting kit is available.

Video
Video performance of the RT-10 befits a reference quality product.The RT-10 features pure cinema, progressive scan component video output, 12-bit/108MHz digital-to-analog converters, and professional grade BNC-style component video output connectors. Pure cinema automatically converts the frame rate of film sources, which are recorded at 24 frames per second, to 60 frames per second for better picture quality. Progressive scan component video output converts interlaced video signals into progressive video signals, which doubles the amount of video information being sent to a compatible display device. The result is a more stable, flicker-free image with fewer video artifacts. And the video digital-to-analog converters ensure that the pristine digital video image does not degrade during the conversion to analog. Comprehensive video adjustments and memory locations complement superior video performance, allowing the RT-10 to be fine-tuned for any type of display device. In addition, the RT-10 features a component video output with RCA connectors for compatibility with products that do not accept BNC connectors, two composite video outputs, and an S-video output. With virtually any display device, the RT-10 is capable of stunning video performance.

Audio
The RT-10 features three S/PDIF digital audio outputs. One AES/EBU, one coaxial, and one optical connector allow for external decoding and processing of Dolby Digital®, dts®, and PCM sources.The RT-10 also has built-in 24-bit/192kHz digital-to-analog converters for all six analog output channels to allow high-bandwidth formats, such as DVD-A and SACD, to be enjoyed in full resolution without any reduction in the sampling rate or digital word length. The result is pristine, high quality audio from any disc.

Intuitive
For optimal performance, the RT-10 is equipped with an extensive array of controls and adjustments.To make setup easier, the RT-10 includes an intuitive, graphical user interface with color on-screen display providing convenient access to menus. Set up is further simplified with an on-screen setup navigator that provides step-by-step guidance through the entire process. When the setup navigator is activated, a series of questions appear on the screen. Just provide the answers and the RT-10 configures itself automatically to output the correct audio signals, video signals, and language settings. For more in-depth configuration, the menu can be set to the expert mode, which provides access to all of the RT-10 features and options. The RT-10 will also allow you to designate frequently used features into a favorite memory location that allows access without having to enter the menu.

Details
At the touch of a button, the video outputs can be turned off, eliminating any possible interference to provide the cleanest possible audio signals.The back panel of the RT-10 has a trigger input, allowing it to be powered on and off by an MC-12 or MC-8 digital controller. The back panel also features an IR input, so the RT-10 can be easily integrated into an IR-based control system without an IR repeater attached to the front panel.

Conclusion
With the ability to play virtually any type of 5” optical disc, the RT-10 represents a solid investment.Whether watching the latest blockbuster on DVD or enjoying a SACD re-mix of an old favorite - the RT-10 is sure to please. Even the most demanding enthusiast will be impressed with its unbeatable combination of performance, flexibility, technological sophistication, and ease of use.

MC-12B

The joy of the Lexicon MC-12B is that it not only offers the outstanding video and audio to take advantage of recent advances in audio and video quality, it also provides the capability to cope with all of these changes and problems in A/V formats. Further-more, it does so about as efficiently as any device can. In fact, I could easily spend a thousand words describing all the ways the Lexicon MC-12B gives you this flexibility, and why its setup is about as easy as the growing complexities of audio/video allow. I could spend another several hundred words on how the remote control is both user-friendly in its obvious features and in the precision with which it allows the skilled user to control things like level adjustment.

The MC-12B has truly advanced digital processing technology—four Analog Devices SHARC 32-bit DSP engines for processing power, 24-bit/96kHz internal processing for analog sources, 24-bit/192kHz D/A converters for playback, and Cirrus Logic's Crystal CS49326 DSP decoder for decoding compressed multichannel audio-data sources.

The MC-12B one of the best sounding digital controllers for both stereo and surround sound we've heard. The overall sound quality of the MC-12B in stereo is excellent. The MC-12B performs to true high-end standards and is notably cleaner, more dynamic, and more detailed than the (quite good) earlier Lexicon MC-1 which is an outstanding unit.

The MC-12B really comes alive with multichannel music and film tracks, however, and an MC-12B that is properly set up for a given system and room is absolutely superb. Equipped with THX, Dolby Digital, THX Surround-EX, Pro Logic II, DTS, and DTS-ES (both matrixed and discrete), the MC-12B also has proprietary digital and analog processing that Lexicon calls Logic 7. Unlike the absurdly unrealistic DSP options in far too many controllers, this feature truly enhances virtually all surround sound, and does so in reproducing every processing mode, regardless of whether it's film or music, or whether DTS, Dolby, THX, stereo, or mono.

The inner menus for setting up and adjusting each surround mode allow you to adjust parameters (like variable crossover settings, tone and tilt controls, and mode adjustments) to suit your ear, room, and system, and to do so in ways that are clearly audible and useful.

Lexicon is clearly the leader in overall surround processing; no other manufacturer comes close to providing logic that is as convincing in so many surround modes. (You do need to sit down with the manual, read the technical description of each feature, and experiment in depth, but this is "no cost" tweaking that actually works!)

The digital processing power of the MC-12B, and its overall design features make it one of the most upgradeable units around. The software is RS232-compatible, and Lexicon is already working on software upgrades for formats like DTS Neo:6. The MC-12B has three internal slots that allow its processing power to be quadrupled, and a rear-panel options plate for new connectors and added circuitry if this is necessary for direct DVD-A, or SACD inputs, or "formatX." There are four rear-panel microphone inputs for future expansion, and two extra "auxiliary outputs" for any additional channels that come along.

Another great strength of the MC-12B is its flexible analog bypass. It may seem strange to praise its digital processing in one breath and then the fact that it can bypass this processing in the next, but the truth is that you're always better off listening to analog stereo or 5.1 sound without passing it through analog-to-digital and then digital-to-analog processing.

The MC-12 allows direct analog bypass when playing back 5.1 or two-channel analog soundtracks, or, these analog signals can be converted into the digital domain to take advantage of the time alignment, bass management, and individual speaker level control features mentioned above.

The MC-12B is very good in analog bypass mode in stereo playback, and it's better than any other A/V controller we've heard in analog bypass mode in 5.1 playback. It's excellent in every parameter of sound quality, with an extremely open presentation and slightly forward soundstage perspective. It's the best-sounding unit we've heard to date for reproducing multichannel SACD and DVD-A music, and is the most flexible in terms of bass management and level balancing.

We feel the MC-12B is exceptional with video with no added noise or loss of picture quality regardless of video component, connection type or screen size.

MC-8

Equipped with 2 independent zones, 8 configurable inputs, and 8 channels of output, the MC-8 is ideal for all but the most elaborate systems.With fewer rear panel connectors and one less zone than the MC-12, the MC-8 is physically smaller and more affordable. Drawing on Lexicon’s legendary expertise in digital audio, the MC-8 offers superior performance and value for today’s music and home theater enthusiast.

Balanced
The MC-8 Balanced includes balanced audio outputs for all channels, including Zone 2. In many installations, the Digital Controller is located in an equipment rack along with tuners, satellite receivers, and so on which can introduce audible interference into the system. By using balanced audio connections between the digital controller and the power amplifier, the potential for audio interference is minimized. For systems utilizing amplified speakers, balanced connections will eliminate noise introduced on cables between the digital controller and speakers.

Powerful
At the heart of the MC-8 are four Analog Devices SHARC digital signal processing engines, one Cirrus Logic DSP engine, and ten 24-bit/192kHz digital-to-analog converters - an architecture that is nearly identical to the MC-12. As a result, the MC-12 and MC-8 share the same tremendous processing power and sonic soul.The MC-8 includes THX Ultra2 certification and dts 96/24 decoding, rounding out its impressive list of playback technologies: Dolby Digital EX, Pro-Logic II, dts-ES, dts Neo:6, and LOGIC7.

LOGIC7
The MC-8 features Lexicon’s decoding technology:
LOGIC7. Based on years of psychoacoustic research, LOGIC7 strikes a delicate balance between channel separation and surround envelopment. For music, film, and broadcast sources, LOGIC7 distinguishes between primary and background signals and processes them appropriately. Prominent sounds like a singer’s voice or an airplane’s roar are reproduced with stunning clarity. The signal is sent to the appropriate speaker with high channel separation, while secondary soundslike the ambient noise of a concert hall or the great outdoors are reproduced with amazing spaciousness. With LOGIC7, the listener experiences an unmatched sense of involvement.

Connected
With formats such as DVD-Video, DVD-Audio, Super Audio CD, and High-Definition TV, the demand for input connectors has grown. The MC-8 provides compatibility with these formats, offering 3 component video inputs and 8 configurable analog inputs. The analog inputs can be configured as; 8 stereo inputs, 5 stereo inputs plus one 5.1-channel input, or 2 stereo inputs plus two 5.1-channel inputs for separate DVD-A and SACD sources.

Expandable
Like the MC-12, the MC-8 provides the ability to easily upgrade its software via a rear panel RS-232 port. The MC-8 also features 2 internal upgrade slots and 2 rear panel access plates, which provide the ability to augment the rear panel connections should upgrades be made available by Lexicon.

Simple
The MC-8 uses the same intuitive on-screen menu system and user interface as the MC-12 for navigation of the set-up options and features. Both new users and those that are familiar with Lexicon digital controllers will instantly feel at home with the MC-8 and will be fine-tuning it in minutes.

Conclusion
Designed with a careful balance of performance and function, the MC-8 is sure to impress with its stellar performance, simple user interface, set-up flexibility, and expandability. Combined with a RT-10 disc player and a LX series power amplifier, the MC-8 serves as the core of a high performance, high value home theater system.

LX-7

Seven-Channel Power Amplifier
Power amplifiers don't always get the attention they deserve in home theater. Unlike A/V controllers they are usually relatively simple, with minimal features and comparatively little technical innovation. The Lexicon LX-7, however, is different. It's a seven-channel amplifier that uses advanced technology to package 200Wpc of fullband power with THX-Ultra certification into a cool-running unit that weighs only 56 pounds and measures a relatively compact 5.65" high by 17.3" wide by 19" deep. Its styling matches that of the Lexicon MC-12B.

Really high power dynamics are a bit of a luxury in stereo music listening; they are a necessity in home theater. The LX-7 delivers a solid 200Wpc with a lot of dynamic energy and excitement. It also does an excellent job of controlling the speakers in the process.

Lexicon managed to put so much power into a reasonable package by making a number of innovations in design. Harman International builds the LX-7 to Lexicon's specifications. Over the past twenty-five years Harman and On Semiconductor have worked extensively to improve the technology used to manufacture output transistors. A result is the custom NPN transistor used in the LX series, which Lexicon claims is significantly more reliable and better-performing than any other used in audio products.

This transistor is a hermetically sealed metal-can device, not subject to a number of wear mechanisms present in transistors that use plastic cases. It's sold only to Harman and the processes used to manufacture it are proprietary. The devices are also hand-graded into five classifications, and then used in matched groups for each amplifier channel.

The key to the design of the LX-7 is a feature that Lexicon calls Junction Temperature Simulation or JTS. Heat is the main threat to every transistor used in an audio device. Internal temperatures can quickly jump to dangerous levels when large voltages and currents are present, and even brief periods of excessive temperature can destroy or degrade them.

Most amplifiers use conventional thermal cut-off sensors to protect their devices. These react only to heat sink temperature, however. And heat sinks have a substantial mass and take a long time to heat up and cool down. A conventional thermal cut-off circuit may still sense that the devices are cool when the transistor's internal junction temperature is well above safe limits.

Lexicon states that JTS overcomes these problems by predicting, in real time, the internal junction temperature of the transistor die. If the transistor ever goes above a safe limit, JTS instantly limits output drive and protects the device. The result is the ability to use every last bit of each transistor without concern for reliability.

This protection circuitry is the reason only four devices per channel are used in the LX-7 amplifier. JTS measures the output voltage across, and current through, each transistor. It uses these measurements to calculate the actual requested output power, and then adds temperature information from the heat sink to de-rate the devices as heat sinks warm. This technology allows the amplifier to safely drive very extreme or reactive loads, including a dead short across the output terminals.

The LX-7 also features thermal protection for each channel and the main power transformer. The amplifiers also provide DC protection for each channel, preventing frequencies below 10Hz from reaching the loudspeakers.

The safety of the amplifier is further reinforced by its quasi-complementary output topology. This eliminates the use of PNP output devices, which have a substantially lower "safe operating area" and are less reliable than their NPN counterparts. Heat sinks are electrically live—thus no insulators are required between the output devices and heat sink, and waste heat is efficiently transferred to the heat sinks. The use of JTS permits very high rail voltages (±80V in the LX series).

Other features of the LX-7 are more conventional, but still of interest. While it may seem like a minor point, there are seven front-panel pilot lights. (You'll know if one channel has problems.) The unbalanced RCA inputs and balanced XLR inputs are individually switchable, and the balanced inputs can take three-channel phono plugs as well as XLR plugs. The output connectors take banana plugs, spade lugs, and bare wires, and are easy to see and reach.

There is a ground-lift switch, which allows you to minimize hum without lifting the AC ground at the power plug, and you can bridge channels to double the power output from two channels. Finally, there is a 12-volt trigger input and a switch to vary the delay when the 12-volt signal from the controller-preamp is used to remotely control the amplifier. Nothing radical, but all well thought out and convenient.

The sound of the Lexicon LX-7 is very close to that of the superb Lexicon MC-12B controller. It has a lot of energy and does a very good job with medium and high-level dynamics. The soundstage is very good, but slightly better in width than depth—more a "Row G" sonic perspective than a "Row M" one. At the same time, the slightly lighter timbre of the LX-7 has more apparent upper octave energy and gives more excitement to music and soundtracks than the competition I've heard.

The LX-7 has some important strengths in the nuances of its sound reproduction. Its life and excitement make it a very involving amplifier, and my daughter is particularly impressed with its ability to reproduce complex dialogue. For some reason, it also works even better with multichannel music than stereo, perhaps because most multichannel music recordings seem to have less treble or upper octave energy than stereo recordings.

Unlike some amplifiers that use trick power supplies to cut their weight, the LX-7 does a fine job with bass. It provides very good control and bass extension, even when driving speakers as demanding extremely high-end power-sucking speakers. Percussion detail on bass drum and the resolution of deep organ passages are very impressive.

If there is a perfect seven-channel amplifier available the LX-7 is certainly excellent value for money, and its mix of sound qualities makes it fully competitive with the best five- and seven-channel amplifiers. It's particularly impressive with film soundtracks and multichannel music.. It's by far the easiest seven-channel amplifier to set up and use and is the best in helping to eliminate or minimize the annoying ground loops that can occur in complex systems.

Introducing the NEW RV-8 Receiver!

Based on the critically acclaimed line of Lexicon preamp/processors and power amplifiers, the RV-8 was designed from the ground up with the enthusiast in mind. The massive power amplifier section outputs an impressive 140 watts on each of its 7 channels across the entire audible spectrum with all 7 channels driven simultaneously.And it does so while retaining exceptional transparency, wide dynamic range and sonic neutrality. The RV-8 delivers real power that makes stand-alone multi-channel power amplifiers blush. Mated with an exceptional preamp/processor utilizing the latest algorithms, including LOGIC7 and an intuitive user interface, the RV-8 can be viewed as “separates” that happen to share the same chassis.

The RV-8 Receiver is an 8-channel audio and video control center with independent zone monitoring that provides control of audio and video source selection in three zones at the same time.The RV-8 includes a host of inputs: a built-in tuner, eight digital audio, eight analog audio, phono, five composite video, five S-video and three component video input connectors. These can be assigned to any of the eight software configurable inputs.The analog input connectors can also be configured to accommodate up to two 5.1-channel analog sources such as DVD-A and SACD. The RV-8 features an integrated 7-channel power amplifier that is designed to achieve high levels of power and performance. Equipped with a massive toroidal power transformer, the amplifier also provides thermal and DC protection.A built-in AM/FM tuner allows for automatic or manual storing of up to 40 preset stations.

The RV-8 offers the latest version of Lexicon’s critically acclaimed LOGIC7 processing, which creates a 7.1-channel output signal from stereo, 5.1- and 6.1-channel sources. Unlike other decoders, LOGIC7 processing is compatible with all input sources and requires no special encoding. LOGIC7 is widely regarded as the finest surround process currently available. A LOGIC7 downmix of multichannel source material is available when using the Headphone listening modes. If a stereo source is present, the dedicated HEADPHONE L7 listening mode utilizes Head Related Transfer Functions that introduce a subtle sense of surround sound, while preserving the original stereo image.

The RV-8 is loaded many high-end audio/video capabilities. Call for more details.




Specifications are subject to change without notice. Products may not appear as shown. © 2004, Advanced Home and Business Solutions Inc. Trademarks are the property of their respective owners. Advanced Home and Business Solutions is not responsible for any errors or omissions in specifications and does not warrant same.




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